One Year: Post Op

So, it’s been about a week since my one year anniversary of having my surgery. I was going to write sooner, but I had to sit back and reflect upon this past year. As I write this, I want to dedicate this specific blog to those who’ve had, thinking about having, or are going to have some sort of weight loss surgery.

Up until my surgery, I hated myself. I hated the body I had, and I hated that I had let myself get to the heaviest weight in my life. It’s truly a strange feeling to feel that I was trapped in a body that I didn’t belong in. It’s a outer body kind of experience when thinking about it. Being in someone else’s body, or at least that’s how it feels. Not believing in the image that reflects back in when looking in the mirror.

Going into this journey with a self loathing, and a feeling of hopelessness, was a big step for myself. Before I decided to take this step, I was ready to die. I was aware that I was slowly killing myself, and at the time before my decision, I didn’t care. This was part of the darkness of disparity. I let the weight and depression control me. I dealt with my pain with food.

While my surgery was a year ago, my journey had actually started almost a year prior, I started to walk and try to get a movement going to start the weight loss process, but I would grow frustrated because I would start to push myself and I would end up hurting myself.  Plus with the physical demands that I have at work, I was not able to heal correctly. I needed to do something, but I didn’t want to have surgery, yet after a few months, I ended up being introduced to somebody who was getting ready to have it, and that person was who helped lead me to that decision.

One of the things I had decided on, before I had the surgery was that I was going to document all the aspects of the process, including the negative aspects of it. The people who’ve had it have said that it was the best decision that they’ve ever made, and that they would do it again, but never talked about the struggles getting there.

The biggest things that happen when going through the surgery is that the abdomen gets pumped full of air. This caused me pain for about a week. It was as bad as when I get trapped air in my chest, which to think about, I don’t think I’ve had that happen in a very long time.  The recommended suggestion is to walk, that way it will help with relieving the gas.

The second hurdle to get through is how the feelings of remorse will hit. Being someone who follows Sleeve groups, I’ve noticed that people start to feel regret either right before, and they get nervous, or after it happened. The worst was when I got to the point where I could eat soft foods. I first time I could have something, it was the first taste that I had the moment of regret overcome me. My wife said that it sounded like postpartum depression. After she said that, it made sense. I did have two-thirds of my stomach removed, and it wasn’t like I could tell the doctors that I didn’t like the feeling so I decided that I wanted my stomach back. This feeling would follow me for several weeks off and on.

The biggest lesson learned was this: It’s a mental game, plain and simple. In truth that’s all the weight loss journey is. If you can mentally over come the reason of why the weight gain-mine was because I was an emotional eater. Depression and a few bouts of shit-getting-to-be-too-much, then the weight loss is a cake walk. Going into the surgery, I kept telling myself that it is a mental game. I went through the process up until that night of confident, and not nervous, until the reality hit about five hours before it was time.

The good news is that after a year, I’m down one-hundred-and-forty-five-pounds. The news that might surprise some people is this: It wasn’t just the surgery that got me there. I know that people might look at this as the easy way to lose the weight. Some might think that after the goal weight is reached, that eating whatever, and how much ever is the end goal. Don’t go with that pattern of thought, because it isn’t how things work. Yes, I lost a lot of weight quickly in the beginning. It felt good to lose fifty-pounds effortlessly. The rest of it has taken hard work and dedication. Life choices had to be changed in order to get myself here. The biggest suggestion the doctors said was to get in ten-thousand steps a day. It sounds like a lot, and holy shit, is it ever. That breaks down to a little over four miles in a day. Imagine traveling four miles by foot, every single day. I’ll be the first to admit that I don’t always get them in. two-thousand was a lot when I started trying to get my steps.

I started to do weight training to help lose the weight and get stronger. I have a personal trainer. Sam’s been a friend for years, and was glad to take me under his wing to help me lose the weight. The interesting part about my training is that it goes beyond the body, he’s also been helping me mentally and spiritually. I’m truly blessed to have his guidance in my life. With the training, my posture has gotten better, and my confidence has gone up. It’s fascinating to learn that the proper way to lift, and walk, when done right, feels a bit awkward.

So, for my final lesson, I have the most important piece of advice for anyone who wants to take the weight loss journey serious. Have a good support system in place. This is the biggest key to any success. My biggest supporters are my wife and kids. If she didn’t give a shit, then I would have not gone anywhere, but stayed the same. She is my biggest ally in all that I do. My kids want me around for a long time and they are also supportive, my son and I bound over going to the gym together one day a week. He learns, and I get to push myself so that he can see what the hard work and dedication does.

I want to thank the rest of my supporters- you who follow me on social media, subscribe to my blog, and those who know me in the real world, thank you. I’ve been blessed to share this journey with so many who’ve been nothing but supportive and positive. It’s nice to have people rooting for my success. For those who I’ve inspired, I want to give a particular shout out too, because this is part of why I do the things that I’m able to do. I needed to feel like I could help, and getting the heart-felt stories from people who call me their inspiration, it helps to know that is the way I’m going to help change the world, one person at a time.

This is the director, and that’s a wrap.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: